Giant Nomura jellyfish

Nomura jellyfish can grow to 2 meters in diameter and weigh up to 220 kilograms. This species is one of the largest jellyfishes in the world. They prefer the cold waters of the White Sea, Kara Sea and Barents Sea, although they often descend to the latitudes of Boston and northern Portugal.

In 1870, residents of a village on the shore of the Gulf of Massachusetts went out to collect fish that had been thrown ashore by a storm and found a giant jellyfish thrown by the sea. The jellyfish turned out to be of astonishing size. The bell was over 7.5 feet (2.3 m) in length, with 120 feet (36.6 m) of tentacles and 121.4 feet (37 m) of full length from top to tip. Cyanoids are produced by reckless fish that take the tentacles as algae, as well as plankton and other jellyfish. In order to catch the prey of cyanide, the tentacles are spread by a fishing net capable of covering the tennis court. What’s not to be touched by the cyanei is the young cod and haddock. Somehow the jellyfish understands that these fish are eating its parasites. For a man, meeting an Arctic giant can lead to painful burns.

The National Geographic Society of the USA considers cyaneia potentially deadly, although the case of death from its poison was recorded only once.

Nomura jellyfish

Nomura jellyfish

Nomura jellyfish

Nomura jellyfish

Nomura jellyfish

Nomura jellyfish

 

 

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