Antarctica and penguins

Antarctica and penguins. Ice in Antarctica is about ten times larger than in Greenland – 90% of all ice on the planet is concentrated here.

Antarctic glaciers contain about 80% of all fresh water on Earth – and if they melted, the level of the world’s oceans would rise by 60 meters. The ice on the ‘white continent’ is melting at a rapid pace: almost every hour, the iceberg breaks off from Antarctica. A couple of months ago, a particularly giant iceberg of 300 square kilometers in size set out on an ocean voyage. It broke away from the largest glacier in Antarctica, Pine Island. Warming affects not only the landscape of Antarctica, but also the fauna of the southern continent. Over the past 50 years, more than half of the penguins living in Antarctica have disappeared: ice has melted and krill, the plankton they feed on, has disappeared from local waters.

Penguins (Sphenisciformes) are the most famous and largest of all the birds inhabiting Antarctica. They make up about 85% of all birds in Antarctica and most of the penguins are Adelie penguins. As it is impossible to find food on an ice-covered Antarctic, penguins are forced to find food at sea, which they spend most of their time searching for. All birds are excellent swimmers and can dive to great depths, for example, the Imperial Penguin dives to a depth of 250 meters.

Antarctica and penguins

Antarctica and penguins

Antarctica and penguins

Antarctica and penguins

Antarctica and penguins

 

 

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